Close

Pediatric Prosthetics

Children deserve the best amputee care possible. We offer it.

Your child deserves a caring and skilled prosthetist working with the best prosthetic technology available.

Parents of children with amputations come to MCOP seeking the care that their child needs to play and live like any other kid. When working with children who have lost limbs either due to emergency amputations or congenital conditions such as Streeter’s Dysplasia or proximal femoral focal deficiency (PFFD), our goal is always to ensure that your child receives a limb that allows them to just be a kid, reducing the impact of amputation on their everyday life.

Generally, children are eligible for prosthetics at the age when they are able to pull up to stand, which typically happens at 9-12 months. Once a child reaches this age, it is best to begin using a prosthetic as soon as possible so they become accustomed to the prosthesis as they develop their sense of self and physically develop from sitting to standing, to running and beyond. As a child grows, sockets may need to be changed once a year or more, and regular adjustments need to be made to keep the prosthetic in-line with their rapidly evolving physical needs.

For children with above knee amputations, typically an unlocked pediatric knee is not advisable until the age of 3-4, while children with bilateral above knee amputations may want to wait until the age of 6 or beyond for their first prosthetic.

Thoughtful pediatric prosthetic care that allows kids to be kids

Because kids will be kids, at MCOP we design pediatric prosthetics that stand up to the highly physical lifestyles of children. We choose components from leading pediatric prosthetic manufacturers that balance optimal function and minimal weight. We also build prosthetic devices that support kids in pursuing their favorite physical activities, be it running, swimming, skiing, or snowboarding.

If you are the parent of a child who is in need of pediatric prosthetic services, are considering an elective amputation for a child, or know of someone who is, contact us for more information.

Share this Page

Have questions? We're here to help.

Contact us Today